How To Stop Eating Sugar

Sugar is one of the most addictive foods we can put into our bodies. Sugar is the ingredient that I believe kept my animal brain caught in a repetitive cycle of binge eating.

Sugar addiction goes beyond candy and cakes… it’s the simple, refined carbohydrates that cause an insulin spike in our blood sugar. This also triggers parts of our brains which can become addicted, just like someone becomes addicted to heroin.

I’ve gotten many emails from readers asking questions about how to deal with their addiction to sugar, which is usually the triggering food for a binge. There are common themes in the questions, and I can relate to many people who are disgusted with their failed attempts to break the habit.

The most common reasons people try to stop eating sugar are usually due to poor health, feeling obsessed and “crazy” around it or trying to lose weight. Many people share that they can’t seem to break away from bread, pasta, sweets or alcohol. The most frustrating part, I think, is that most of us realize that junk food and processed foods aren’t good for us. But even though we know that, trying to break a habit of eating it regularly can be very challenging.

Before I pin-pointed sugar as the culprit for my addictive behaviors to binge eating, I would go most of the day eating very little (to make up for a binge the night before), and using sugar substitutes in my coffee or drinking diet soda to stave off hunger. By evening, I would be starving… and naturally craving foods with instant energy, like carbs and sweets. By this point, my animal brain was feeling deprived and looking for energy. My ability to consciously choose healthy food options was severely negated because my brain would be in survival mode.

Because I’d binged the night before, it made it very easy to again turn to binging because I had started creating a habit. Once a habit forms, your brain has begun creating neural pathways that make repeating the habitual behavior much easier the next time.

It wasn’t until I reached very low points in my habits, hating myself and my inability to stop binge eating, that I started seriously studying what was going on with my behavior. That’s when I discovered how addictive sugar can be, and realized I was battling a hormonal shift in my brain each time I ate sugar. Not only had I created a behavioral habit, but I was dealing with an addicted brain.

There’s no easy way to quit a habit when you have an addiction. To cure yourself from a habit and addiction to sugar, you have to stop eating it. In order to do that, it really helps to know what to expect 먹튀검증커뮤니티 from your brain as it breaks an addiction. When you know what to expect, you can deal with challenges as they come up.

The things I found most useful were understanding how the brain works and studying the psychology of habits. Then I began to apply what I’d learned and was able to break through my binge eating habit.

Quitting sugar meant also giving up my devotion to artificial sweeteners. I had to do this for two reasons: one, to adjust my taste buds so that I wouldn’t crave sweetness, and two, to restore the proper gut flora in my belly to begin to metabolize food normally again.

As I broke my addiction to sugar, I replaced sugary foods in my diet with healthy fats. I found that eating healthy fats, proteins and an abundance of vegetables curbed my cravings. For this period, I stayed away from carbohydrates (refined or whole grain) and fruits.

Once I had broken my addiction (it took about 2 1/2 months of focused effort), I had replaced my diet with all whole foods and began incorporating fruit and whole grains. The fruit tasted yummy and sweet at this point, and I would be satisfied having fruit or a bowl of oatmeal at the end of the day when I normally would have craved sweets or sugar-free candies.

Now, I notice that if I start to pine for sweets, it appears to be after I’ve gone several days without whole grains or unrefined carbs. I feel comfortable with having some whole grain toast, oatmeal or something similar… and the temptation goes away. For me, eating whole grains work better to curb the sugar craving than eating fruit, because fruit metabolizes quickly and raises blood sugar faster.

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